Complex Silence 40 – Mystified

Complex Silence 40 cover art

https://archive.org/details/Complex_Silence_40

We’ve come to yet another milestone in the Complex Silence Series.

To mark our 40th release, Mystified returns with a superb longform mix of the artists and releases CS-31 through CS-39.

1. Grove Of Whispers- Complex Silence 39
2. Jack Hertz – StarfishComplex Silence 34
3. Phillip Wilkerson & Mystified – The Darkest Where Of Every WhenComplex Silence 32
4. Eric Jackson – Om Of DescentComplex Silence 31
5. Various Artists – Complex Silence 33
6. Daniel Barbiero – Phase Transformation in EthersComplex Silence 37
7. LAJ – Complex Silence 35
8. Scott Lawlor – Complex Silence 36
9. Ran Kirlian – The Shape Of MemoriesComplex Silence 38

The mix starts out quietly subdued and then gradually moves into darker and more abstract territory before returning to a reflective calm.

Thank you to Mystified for a gorgeous recap and thanks once again to the contributing artists who’ve helped the Series reach this new plateau. Most of all, thank you all for listening!

pcw ~ oct 2013

Complex Silence 39 – Grove of Whispers

Grove of Whispers - Complex Silence 39

https://archive.org/details/Complex_Silence_39

Complex Silence 39 may be the most relaxing and peaceful of all. It’s a longform lullaby of moonlight. Or a caress of warm ocean waves. Or a lazy, drifting flight high above the Earth. Or, all of the above.

At first listen, I thought I might venture to call this piece neo-classical, but then I realized that’s instantly too stuffy.

On repeated listening, I would definitely call it pure space music–the kind you hear while watching the Earth gingerly rising over a moonscape or perhaps better yet, a slow-motion drift through fantastic starscapes and wondrous nebulae. You could loop this all night and let it be your audio dream maker.

Whatever images this music conjures up in your mind, it’s the result of John Tocher (aka Grove of Whispers) working his musical magic in your ears and right before your mind’s eye.

But don’t stop with this release. Visit the Grove of Whispers website if you haven’t already. It’s a storehouse of rich ambient gems–not all of it dark and experimental either. If you enjoy ambient music, you need to discover John’s work as well as his podcasts. I’ll admit, I wasn’t familiar with many of his releases; I had the mistaken idea that he was working strictly within the experimental and noise genres. This isn’t the case. Hopefully, Complex Silence 39 will compel you to a new appreciation of this amazing ambient Master.

Thank you John for a lovely contribution to the Series!

http://groveofwhispers.com

~

This release is http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Cover image by Daniel Zedda.

Complex Silence 38 – Ran Kirlian

CS-38-Album-cover-(300)

https://archive.org/details/Complex_Silence_38

Welcome to Complex Silence 38.

If your August is feeling hot and sticky, then prepare yourself for a cool and refreshing ambient rain shower as only ambient master Ran Kirlian can conjure up.

Or, draw yourself a bath, light some candles, and perhaps snuggle up with a significant other and soak into this floating, drifting, comforting cocoon of sound.

In any of these scenarios (or whatever escape you choose to lose yourself in), Ran’s music is equally able to provide a soothing balm–a spacey and wondrously delightful atmosphere.

There’s really no reason to say anything else; the musical experience is far better than a wordy description. After a few minutes of listening, you won’t need further convincing.

Thank you, Ran for this beautiful addition to the Complex Silence series.

http://www.rankirlian.com

http://rankirlian.bandcamp.com

http://www.alteraorbe.com

Complex Silence 37 – Daniel Barbiero

Daniel Barbiero offers an excursion into the possibilities of the prepared double bass as Complex Silence 37.

CS37 cover art

https://archive.org/details/Complex_Silence_37

Daniel sent along these notes about his release:

I have often suspected, that there may be in the Air some yet more latent Qualities or Powers differing enough from all these, and principally due to the Substantial Parts or Ingredients, whereof it consists.

Robert Boyle, Suspicions about the Hidden Realities of the Air (1674)

“As with air, so with sound. Allusions to Fogs & Liquids collects two pieces for processed double bass and prepared double bass in which the hidden realities of sound—the overtones arising from the fundamental—form the basis for expansive soundscapes.”

“Live improvisations for solo double bass and for prepared double bass were recorded and then manipulated to create slowly moving sonic environments which remain fundamentally rooted in the nature of the instrument.”

Allusions to Fogs & Liquids represents a type of music concerned with sound as something in itself, a material externality. But it can’t help but carry associations. Here the listener takes over from the composer/performer.”

You can learn more about Daniel and hear additional pieces at his Soundcloud site and at Free Music Archive.

Complex Silence 36 – Scott Lawlor

CS36 - Scott Lawlor

https://archive.org/details/Complex_Silence_36

Another rising star in the netlabel ambient world makes a debut with Complex Silence 36. While it is definitely true that Scott Lawlor is still searching for his musical voice, sometimes hearing a fresh voice serves as creative inspiration for us all.

Here we have Lawlor exploring the longform ambient track, stretching his musical legs so to speak for 50+ minutes.

The result is a wonderful low-volume excursion through beautiful harmonies, washes of rich ambient color, and a tapestry of quiet and contemplative sighs, both varied and complex. Yet Lawlor doesn’t venture too far from classical ambience–it’s obvious his respect and reverence for ambient music precedes his attempts at creating it. He has done his ambient homework as a listener.

As a musician exploring the classical ambient forms, Lawlor seems quite comfortable letting the music take its own path and tell its own story at its own pace. And although it’s still early in Scott’s career, it’s that trait, perhaps, that makes his beginning attempts worth paying closer attention to. In this track, he lets the music wend its way through his hands to our ears, never imposing too much structure or too many rules or too much intention. Indeed, when writing to me about this piece, Scott called it an improvisation, which immediately interested me in hearing it and making it a part of the CS Series.

It’s an honor to present (and be present for) a promising foray into the ambient world.

Welcome, Scott!

~ PW, May 2013